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Project Kakuma

100 Global Educators Offering Free Education to the Kakuma Refugees, via Skype

Child at Kakuma Refugee camp

Every child
deserves
an education

100 Global Teachers offering Free Education

The kakuma project is a group of more than 100 teachers from 40 countries over 6 continents willing to offer free education via Skype.

This project was set up in April 2015. We sent some laptops to the Kakuma Refugee Camp (Kenya) and started to teach via Skype. Imagine 150 students taking a look at one single laptop screen. We offer knowledge (Maths, Science, Art) to the refugees and bring empathy into the global classrooms.

What's better than learning about global issues directly from people living in those countries?

Teachers helping teachers

As teachers we know that the proper resources can transform our classrooms. While we all have varied resources and tools at our disposal, we have the basics - pen, paper, textbooks, and computers. Some of us are in environments where every child has a laptop; some have fewer devices, but every student still has his own textbook. For us, we teach 20 to 40 students at a time and have adequate (if not ample) supplies for every student.

Not every teacher, however, is as fortunate. Could you imagine teaching 150 to 200 students at a time? How about 200 students with 20 textbooks and no computers? Unimaginable? Maybe for us, but not for the teachers in the . Every teacher teaches 150 to 200 students and has one textbook for every ten students. A 1:200 ratio for teaching, and 1:10 ratio for resources is not the best learning environment, but Kakuma refugee teachers do their best every day to provide their students with a rich learning environment.

To honor their dedication to their students, we want to support these amazing teachers by helping them obtain the resources every student needs. Our plan is to raise money to purchase textbooks and other supplies for Kakuma refugee students so every child has what she needs. Will you help us? Please donate or play our game


Update

2017 May We Care Solar went to the camp to install a solar suitcase in Cush Primary School. The solar power allows the teachers to charge the laptops. Some facts about the The average class size is 250 students (crammed into an average size classroom). They had no electricity. They've had about 30 boy students sleeping at the school every night because the school is far from home and they need to study. He said they each pitched in 20 cents to charge one lantern each week so the 30 students could share that light for studying after dark. They were thrilled to be getting light the very next day thanks to the solar suitcase we bought.

2017 Apr We received 10 laptops donated by Partena and OVSG. They will be sent to Kakuma by the end of April. They can be used in 10 different classrooms or schools and will allow to educate thousands of refugee students.


2017 Mar Nine will climb Mont Ventoux (France) and will be sponsored to the benefit of the Kakuma project. Check KlimmenVoorKakuma.com [NL]


2017 Jan We are now a group of 100 educators, from 40 countries over 6 continents dedicated to the project.


2016 Dec the University of Hasselt supported "the warmest week" and collected nearly $2000 to the benefit of our project


2016 Aug 100 story books were sent to the camp. Educators Kelli and Valery managed to collect story books with their students.


2016 June Indian teacher Vineeta sent 5 robot car Kits to the camp to be able to conduct classes STEM.


Yes! We bought our first devices (laptop + projector + sound system) which will form our mobile school. These devices will be used by 5 Kakuma schools to facilitate our Skype calls.

About Kakuma Refugee Camp

Kakuma is a town in the north-western region of Kenya. The town has hosted the Kakuma Refugee Camp since 1992. This camp currently serves over 179,000 people who have fled wars and violence in neighboring countries. People of all ages live in Kakuma - from Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, South Sudan, DRC, Rwanda, Burundi, Eritrea and Uganda. The largest group are Somalian - at 44.5% of the community - followed by the South Sudanese at 33.7%.

A small gift can make a large difference.

World map

Although 55% of the refugees in Kakuma are children, over half of the school-age children do not attend school. Factors impacting school attendance include child labor, cultural barriers, lack of resources, family needs, and marrying young. Why? Refugees flee their homes due to war, conflict, and persecution. Many are separated from their families and friends and have no options to support themselves other than to rely on aid. Children regularly make the journey to Kakuma camp alone.

Available languages: DA | DE | EN | ES | FI | GR | LT | NL | PT
Contact us:
Help Kakuma VZW - 0638.928.013 - Runksterkiezel 28 - 3500 Hasselt - Belgium